Mixing Neutrals

I feel like everyone loves the idea of neutral decor, but it tends to cause overthinking. “This beige doesn’t match this beige and this is the wrong shade of off white.” Sound familiar? Do yourself a favor, don’t overthink it. The key is balance. Having a good amount of neutral color variations in different textures will balance a room. Trying to match each shade of white/beige/gray won’t look natural and it may drive you crazy.

Here are a few examples to give you an idea of what I mean by balance.

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The above room pulls off neutrals beautifully. The sofas, pillows, rug and wall color are all different shades of creamy white/beige, but because they’re all different textures, they flow well together. Strategically placed items in the same color family but darker (baskets, pots, blanket) pull the room together and give it dimension.

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Above is another example of various shades of neutrals used together. Here, not only do the textures vary but patterns vary as well. Again, balance is key. Be sure to use large and small patterns together. Too many large patterns can appear bold; too many small patterns appears to be busy.

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Once again, a wonderful example of mixing patterns and textures. I also love the subtle pop of color with pillows and flowers.

Struggling with paint colors? Check out my post here.

Indoor/Outdoor Rugs …Indoors

Most people think of indoor/outdoor rugs as outdoor rugs, that look like indoor rugs. They can certainly be described that way, they’ve come a long way since the fake grass look, but I actually like indoor/outdoor rugs indoors as well. They are very durable and easy to maintain. They may not be your softest, plushest carpet, but they sure make cleaning up soggy, mashed in goldfish much easier than on a rug with higher pile.

We bought our living room rug a couple of years ago and have been very happy with the decision to get an indoor/outdoor one. They work great in areas with kids and pets. I also like the idea for kitchens where there’s a lot of traffic, water, and messes. If you’re considering one, here are a few to take a look at.

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Also…regarding sizes, the rule has always been to have at least your front furniture legs touching the rug, but when in doubt, I think it’s always best to go bigger. There’s nothing worse than an area rug floating in the room.

Trend I’m Loving: Patterned Tile

Patterned tile is everywhere and I’m really digging it. I’m kind of a commitment- phobe when it comes to decor in my house (just ask my husband who has to deal with constant changes around here) so I don’t know if I could dive into this trend full force, but I’ll admire it in other homes all day.

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Even though its a huge commitment, I actually really like patterned tiles on the floor; that’s the mom in me talking who has to mop her kitchen floor daily! I think the key to pulling it off is keeping all other patterns minimal or muted. What do you think of this trend? Would you put patterned tile in your home?